Dos and Don'ts of Cotton Bedding Care

Designer bedding and all luxury bed linen and accessories, such as throws, luxury single duvet and pillow cases, need to be taken care of to ensure they stay looking good and last longer. So, to keep your luxury duvet looking 'luxury' and your double bed throws looking doubly divine, have a look at some of the common questions asked about how to take care of your cotton bedding and learn the dos and don'ts. If you want to achieve a super smooth look for your luxury duvet sets or cotton sheets, then it is possible to iron them. The most effective and less labor-intensive way of doing this is to iron them while still a little damp and with a hot iron, to make it easier to press creases out. Drying your cotton duvet covers, sheets or pillow cases in a tumble dryer won't give you a gentle, outside fragrance but it is hugely practical and convenient in the winter months. You will need to use a low setting and it is advisable to fold sheets and duvets as soon as you take them out of the dryer, to avoid unnecessary creases. Cotton bedding does not usually need to be professionally cleaned and most can be machine washed at 30 degrees. More delicate fabrics can be washed on a gentle, cool cycle and air dried. It goes without saying that you should always check the label on your bed linen before washing. If you've got a king duvet set, double duvet set or those tricky fitted sheets that you wrangle with each time you come to fold them, you are not alone. It first of all helps, with fitted sheets, to tuck one set of corners into the other while folding in half, so that they sit on top of one another, fold this shape in half again and flatten out while doing so. Keep on folding until you have a small rectangle shape that can be neatly stored away. A useful tip is to store sheets inside your pillowcases. Make sure your storage area is clean and dry and away from sunlight and ensure you don't pack your items too tightly into storage boxes or drawers as this won't allow enough air to circulate. Packing a king size duvet into a small cardboard box is a 'no-no'! We recommend having two or three sheets for each bed you have. This way, you can rotate the sheets when they are in storage, on the bed and in the laundry, meaning you always have sheets ready to use. Alternate the use of the sheets as evenly as you can and this way, the amount of wear they endure will be the same. From double bedding sets to king size duvets, to decorative cushions and throws, all our bed linen and accessories at Dusk come with care instructions which are also available to view online before you purchase. Have a look at all our collections and the many discounts we offer.

Dos and Don'ts of Cotton Bedding Care 1

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Australian Lexicon Can Leave You a Few Roos Loose - Reuters
Australian Lexicon Can Leave You a Few Roos Loose - Reuters
SYDNEY (Reuters) - Summer in Australia wouldn't be complete without a trip to one of the country's famed beaches. Take your togs or cossies, your esky packed with amber fluid and maybe a dog's eye for a snack. Bend the elbow too much? Stop off for a long black, a short black or a flat white to make sure you don't end up a few kangaroos (roos) loose in the top paddock. Translation: Take your swimwear and cooler box full of beer and a meat pie to eat. A bit too much to drink? Have a small or large black espresso coffee or a white coffee to make sure you are fully compos mentis when you get home. Welcome to the Australian vocabulary. Beyond the stereotyped "G'day" (hello) of souvenir T-shirts and "Crocodile Dundee" movies, are many words rich in tradition that define the Australian identity and give continuity to the variety of voices and experiences that shaped the country's history. As a tourist they are fun to hear, but you'll need to learn them if you plan to call Down Under home. Under planned new citizenship tests designed by the government to bind a nation of immigrants to common values, would-be Australians will have to demonstrate they know the meaning of mateship, having a go and dinkum. Symbolizing the resourceful comradeship at the heart of Australians' self-image, mateship is a close bond of friendship, having a go means a willingness to try anything, while dinkum means genuine or true. Assuming you pass the tests and move to Australia, you'll probably find yourself flat out like a lizard drinking, that's extremely busy, from the hard yakka or labor of your new job. If you get time for a beach picnic try not to let the heat and beer make you chunder or vomit in the dunny, that's toilet. If one word can perhaps symbolize the development of the Australian vocabulary, it could be chunder. Legend has it that the word hails from the time of the British ships that transported convicts to the new colony of Australia. It was a 12-month trip on stormy seas - a prescription for sea sickness. The convicts were housed in bunk-like beds, where they generally ended up when feeling ill. Anyone on the top bunk who was about to vomit would yell "watch out under" to warn inhabitants of the lower bunks of the impending delivery. As with most Australian slang, the original phrase got shortened over time, and watch out under became chunder - or so the story goes. Setting up home in Australia will require a stop at a manchester shop. Manchester is what the locals call bed linen, because Manchester, the northern British industrial city and one-time center of the cotton spinning industry, was the main source of bedding for Australia's early settlers. They'll also sell you a doona - a bed quilt usually filled with feathers and called a duvet in other countries. If you want it delivered, you'll get a docket (receipt) to show the driver. If you're hungry after shopping, pick up a lamington - a square cake made of sponge rolled in chocolate and sprinkled with coconut, supposedly named after Charles Baillie, 2nd Baron Lamington and governor of Queensland state from 1896 to 1901. The cake may have originally been made either in an image of the baron's favored hats, or as a way of using up left-over stale sponge. Either way, it's said the baron hated them. Or try an Anzac biscuit, named after the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZACS) who fought in the First World War and whose grit, courage and consummate mateship are imprinted on the national consciousness. A hard biscuit typically of oatmeal and coconut with syrup or treacle, some say it was made by women at home to send to soldiers on the killing fields of France and Gallipoli in Turkey. Others say the name did not appear until after the war. Sweets or candies are called lollies in Australia, and they don't have to be iced, as the word would mean in Britain. Of course it's not all sweetness in any country. In Australia you'll want to avoid a stoush, that's a fight but with the 'ou' pronounced as in 'ouch', with a larrikin or troublemaker, where you might suffer a Larry Dooley or a beating, derived in part from the name of a boxer famous a century ago. And watch out for rorts, that's frauds or con tricks. Unless of course it's only a furphy - a rumor. This word is derived from World War One battlefields where rumors traveled with the carts bringing water to the soldiers in the trenches. The carts were made by the Australian company Furphy.
2021 07 27
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Antique Bed Linens - Choosing the Right Size Antique Linen Sheets, Coverlets & Bedspreads
Antique Bed Linens - Choosing the Right Size Antique Linen Sheets, Coverlets & Bedspreads
Buying the Right Size Antique or Vintage BeddingLinen sheets, coverlets or bedspreadsOne of the advantages of buying antique bed linen is often the quality of antique bedding is higher than the equivalent priced modern linens. How else can you find such a wide selection of affordable & unique hand sewn bed linensThe difficulty shopping online is that antique bed linens are not marked with bed sizes like modern linens. Don't worry, it's very simple to work out, there's just a few questions to answer.What Size is Your BedStandard Bed SizesCredit: Skeffling Lavender FarmHow thick is your mattress Recommendations for sheet comfort areAdequate length to tuck in at least 8-12" underneath the end of the bed.Adequate width to give 10-15" extra per side for sheets to cover you or tuck under the mattress. What size bed sheets do you need Correct Sheet Width = Width of Mattress Top 20-30"Correct Sheet Length = Length of Mattress Top Mattress Thickness 8-12"If in any doubt, measure one of your own top sheets you are comfortable with and keep the dimensions on a sticky note close on your computer monitor for online shopping.Table for Choosing Correct Sheet SizesCredit: Skeffling Lavender FarmUnused French Metis Linen and Cotton Ladderwork SheetsCredit: Skeffling Lavender FarmSizing Antique BedspreadsChoosing the right size bedspread is very similar to choosing sheets. You need bed size, mattress thickness and bed frame height, which should give the height of mattress top to floor. Heights of bed-frame and pillow-top mattresses vary a lot.Measure your mattress-top height, from top of mattress to floor for best results. It only takes a minute and will save you lots of hassle later!Recommendations for comfort and elegant appearanceAdequate length (including fringe) to reach or nearly reach floor at end of bed (roughly 20-30" on top of mattress length), around 24" highAdequate width (including fringe) to reach or nearly reach floor at each side of bed (roughly 40-60" on top of mattress width), around 48" wideBedspread Width = Width of Mattress Top 2 x (Mattress-top height from floor)Bedspread Length = Length of Mattress Top Mattress-top height from floor For smaller style antique woven coverlets or crochet bedspreads that just reach the bed-skirt, use the sheet calculations.You can still buy the smallest coverlets if you like. Smaller coverlets can be used & displayed folded at the foot of an antique bed, or you can use them to snuggle on the couch.Antique Bedspread Sizing TableCredit: Skeffling Lavender FarmLook for the following When Buying Antique Bed Linens OnlineIf the piece you are considering has a "framed" rectangular bed top portion, it will look nicer if the dimensions match your mattress top sizeYou may find more affordable pieces if wear and repairs are acceptable at the foot of the bed and below the dropSome bedspreads are made with no end frill for footed beds, there's no need to add the end drop dimension when calculating required sizeThe cut-out bedspreads for 4 poster beds are still very pretty on a regular bed with no frame, especially the lace onesCheck shipping costs carefully as some bedding can be surprisingly heavy, especially linen and crochetOften "mistakes" or damaged bedlinens are delightful as draperies and curtains. In the folds and drape, appearance of imperfections is minimalHappy Antique Bed Linen Shopping!These are just a guideline to help you online shopping for beautiful quality antique bed linens. It is up to your own taste and needs for you to decide to make a purchase.For those addicted to inexpensive, small antique linen related gifts and ideas, there are some beautiful high quality needle laces, bobbin laces, point laces, padded satin irish linen, madeira work and even the English filet crochet is simple and elegant.I hope this has helped you to shop for antique linen sheets more confidently! For the Christmas and Thanksgiving holidays, it is worth considering antique table linens for a wonderful traditional festive holiday meal. Choosing the correct size for antique tablecloths can be just as simple.
2021 07 27
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How  Infused Clothing Is Fast Becoming Popular ...
How Infused Clothing Is Fast Becoming Popular ...
Copper is a beautiful red-hued metal that's often used in jewelry and decorative arts, but there's far more to it. This mineral is naturally found in the bodies of plants and animals, where it fights disease and helps cells to develop and survive. It's also one of the most powerful antimicrobials found in nature, killing over 99% of germs upon contact.We need trace amounts of copper in our diet to remain healthy, but the benefits of this miracle metal are also available in the form of copper infused clothing. By incorporating copper ions within the fibers of different materials, we can enjoy antibacterial protection and thermal regulation through simple daily-use items such as socks, underwear, pajamas and even bed linen!Copper-infused clothing and accessories are changing the face of the healthcare industry across various segments. Let's look at 5 areas where the health benefits of copper clothing are most obvious, and why copper-infused products are becoming popular with people who suffer from certain conditions.5 Health and Wellness Benefits of Copper ClothingHere are some of the main ways in which people are benefiting from the health-boosting powers of copper:The Copper Revolution is Spreading across SectorsCopper has been used for contact surfaces in healthcare and food settings for many years now, but it's becoming common in other applications as well. Thanks to modern science and technological innovations, we've been able to harness its benefits in an unbelievable variety of products, and there's plenty more to come!
2021 07 26
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Ideas and Solutions for Your Bedroom Decor and Bedding Needs
Ideas and Solutions for Your Bedroom Decor and Bedding Needs
People are working harder than ever in a stressful work environment.A good night's sleep therefore is more important than ever. After a hard day's work you should be entitled to beautiful sleep on your bed in a well decorated bed room. We need to pay more attention to the bedroom. What are things to do to improve our sleeping experience and comfort?Here are some ideas and tips to improve life in the bedroom. First of all, get a bed that is big enough for you. Ideally get a king or queen size bed for you and your partner. You need a comfortable mattress. There are different types of construction and materials ranging from springs to foam to latex. Choose one that suits you. Next come the bed linen. If you want your bedroom to look like a luxurious hotel room, then you need to pick high quality bed linen. It may cost more but it's worth it as it can last for decades! How do you determine its quality? It depends on the quality of the fiber and the number of threads woven per inch. The higher the thread count, the softer and more durable. Choose thread count of at least 200. Pure linen is comfortable and cooling. Pure Linen comes from the plant Flax and its white color comes from the plant itself. Pure linen becomes stronger when it is wet. So that is no fear of damaging it during washing. Nowadays pure linen may be mixed with cotton or other synthetic fiber like polyester so that it is crease free after drying. Cotton is also a firm favorite. It is extremely durable and has the best wear resistance among all fabrics. Repeated washings make cotton fabric even softer to the touch. Pure Linen is lighter than cotton and has better texture. Cotton is better for reproducing print designs.Some people still use bedspread to cover their beds. Bedspreads are kept away at night during sleep. Comforters let you cover the bed during the day with convenience and ease. In the night you can sleep under it and it provides warmth and comfort. You can choose feathers or down. Of course, down is better. Goose down is better than duck down. The comforter keeps you warm and at the same time decorates your bed. Consider getting reversible comforters for more choices of colors and styles.White linen is a good choice for your bed as it can match easily with your bedroom decor.You can also have matching color schemes with the bed linen matching the walls or the curtains or even the decor of your bathroom. Sometimes , contrasting fabric colors also add an interesting element to your bedroom. Another idea is to have different patterns featuring the same color. For sheer class and elegance decorate your bed with a bed skirt. You can have a loveseat in front of your bed and a little table too. A rug on the floor adds further warmth to the room.The bedroom is where you seek solace . In your private moment you may want to read a book or watch television. Make sure you have adequate lighting . A table lamp next to your armchair would be ideal.You would also like ample storage space. Consider installing shelving above your headboard.Lastly, you can personalize your room by displaying some decorative items like a vase or pictures.
2021 07 26
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Buying Guide on Bed Linens
Buying Guide on Bed Linens
If you are a very style conscious person then buying bed linen can sometimes become a very tedious job as you will have to consider too many things like Which bed lien fabric is the best in terms of quality & thread count? Which color to buy? Is this fabric wrinkle free or not? Also you will have to consider the bedroom decor and its style. So you must be familiar with every aspect on how to buy bed linen. Read this handy buying guide on bed linen to unsolve your queries.Different fabrics of Bed LinenFabric can be man-made and natural. Natural fabric consists of cotton, hemp, silk, bamboo and flax. This is also called organic and environment friendly fabric as to produce raw material for this no fertilizers and chemicals are used. The organic fabric is hypoallergenic and more breathable. But bed linen made from natural fabric gets wrinkles very easily. On the other hand you can also go for the man-made fabric in which some synthetic is mixed with the natural ones. Polyester is the example of this. These bed linens are not prone to wrinkles and have resistance towards molds and mildews.Various FabricsSilk: You need something lavish and royal for your bedroom then go for the silk fabric. Here you can further check for the work on it. You will find embroidery, patchwork, appliques on these silk bed linens.Cotton: If you really like softness then nothing better than cotton bed linens. You can either go for the Pima cotton or Egyptian cotton. Also buy 100% cotton.Polyester: Polyester is made by blending two or more fabrics. It is also a good substitute for cotton. If you need something that dries quickly and easy to wash then go either for cotton/modal or cotton/lyocell blends.Satin: Satin is rough from one side and very smooth and shiny from the other. So it will have both anti-slip as well as sheen quality. Quilted satin bed linen looks very elegant on the bed.Flannel: Flannel is one such fabric that is very warm in winter and very soft to feel. SO for winter season keep flannel bed linen for your bedroom that are decorated with laces and ribbons.Importance of Thread CountSoftness of any fabric is measured by thread count that is mentioned on the pack containing it. Thread count measures the number of threads in one square inch of the fabric. You will find bed linen from 80 to 800 and even more thread count. Generally more the thread count more the softness but bed linen with more thread count is generally less durable and really needs extra care. You can go for the thread count that range between 200-300.Hypoallergenic PropertyIf you are allergic to dust the synthetic bed linen are not meant for your. Do not buy the one that has the label mentioning no ironing as the surface of these bed linens are coated with chemicals. You can buy silk bed sheets because of their natural hypoallergenic tendency.ColorYou will find all sorts of colors here from dark, bright to natural and light shades. You can pick the one according to your choice and taste. Also keep in mind your bed room decor and color of curtains, style of pillow covers, rugs and furniture as everything must blend with each other. Do not buy every thing in loud color but do some mix and match here. Make the combination of various colors and find which one gel with each other. Like light pink and light yellow mix with each other very well.So consider all the elements of design and style while buying bed linen.
2021 07 26
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Buyers Guide to Bedlinen
Buyers Guide to Bedlinen
Investing in new bed linen is a quick and easy way to give your bedroom a modern update. Here's our guide to the latest trends and how to choose and care for your bedding...Thinking of updating your bedroom? One of the simplest and most affordable ways to give your sleeping space a fresh look is with a new set of bed linen. 'The bed is one of the easiest places to make a style statement of colour, texture and personality - of any kind and at any budget,' says Polly Dickens, creative director at The Conran Shop. 'A set of linen can provide a block of focal colour, while an inexpensive throw or pair of contrasting or textured pillowcases are a quick fix to lift any bedroom.'But with literally stacks of bed linen to choose from, where do you invest for the best? Does thread count really count, and what's in a weave? If you don't know your sateen from your seersucker, or are puzzled by pattern, fear not: we've asked the experts for all the tips to make buying bed linen a breeze.BEFORE YOUR BUY BED LINEN'The first thing to consider when you're buying your bed linen is whether you're happy to get the iron out,' says Chrissie Rucker, founder of The White Company. 'If you are, there are plenty of fabulous qualities and weaves available.' The majority of bed linen is woven from cotton, which is durable and easy to care for, as well as being a natural, breathable fibre, making it ideal for sheets. But top-class bed linen is not all about the thread count.Thread count refers to the number of strands woven into one square inch of fabric - generally a higher number means a denser weave and a softer, smoother product. Thread counts can range from 180 through to 1,000, but it's the quality of the fibre used that really makes the difference - a 200 thread count fine cotton sheet can have a softer feel than a 400 thread count sheet made from inferior cotton (Egyptian cotton is considered to be the finest quality).Finishing processes have a lot to do with the way bedding feels and can help reduce wrinkling and maintain colour. 'The way a sheet feels matters most,' says Richard Boyle, CEO of Yves Delorme UK. 'It's important to touch the sheets before you buy, and bear in mind that cotton gets softer with use.'ALTERNATIVE OPTIONSIf you'd rather not use the iron, then choose pure cotton with a textural finish, such as a seersucker. Another option is polycotton. 'There are some excellent polycotton sheets on the market, but also some nasty ones,' says Chrissie Rucker. 'Choose 50/50 polyester/cotton and always buy a percale with a thread count of 180 or more.' The other alternative to cotton is linen. Woven from flax, it's cool and crisp with amazing breathability, although it can be tricky to press. 'And there are eco-friendly options available,' says Sue Roberts, design manager for homewares at House of Fraser. 'Look for 100 per cent organic cotton and even cotton bamboo, an all-natural product that feels luxurious.''The weave describes the way the individual yarns were woven or twisted together when the fabric was made,' says designer Lulu Guinness. 'It will make a difference to the look and feel of your bed linen.'Percale has been through a process that combs out the shorter, rougher fibres to make a fine-quality cotton. It has at least 180 threads per square inch and is smooth, crisp and cool to the touch.Sateen has a more glamorous feel, as it is woven from finer threads and has a higher thread count (typically 300). There's a slight lustre to the finished fabric and a softer handle. It's slightly less hardwearing than percale, but very smooth and can look great in colour.Jacquard has a soft feel like sateen rather than the crisper feel of percale. A special loom is used to create a matt/sateen self-pattern on the fabric. This can be a stripe, floral or a check.Oxford weave is made from yarns that have been doubled and woven into a particular pattern, a bit like basket weave. This thicker type of weave is often used for making high-quality men's shirts.Flannel is brushed after weaving to give a soft, fluffy surface texture. This makes it lightweight but warm and ideal for winter use.BED LINEN TRENDSClassic whites 'The world is awash with plain-white bedding so, for 2009, look for linen that is more crafted,' says Polly Dickens, creative director at The Conran Shop. 'The new whites are heavily textured. Choose pieces that will last and look good for years.' The key to an all-white bed is to use a mixture of finishes and weaves - perhaps a waffle duvet cover teamed with self-stripe sheets and a cashmere throw. Seersucker, pleats, embroidery, broderie anglaise and subtle cording can add interest. Manufacturers are picking up on the nostalgic trend, too. 'For summer, we're going for a classic feel,' says Kristina Lindhe, CEO of Lexington. 'We're mixing old with new for a fresh vintage look.'Neutrals and naturals 'If you want your bedroom to feel like a Zen retreat, choose calm neutrals and soft shades,' suggests Siobhan King, managing director of Aura. Soft hues create a relaxing, sanctuary feel, and layering is an easy way to liven up your bed, by adding a dash of another daring shade in the form of the odd pillowcase, throw or boudoir cushion. And you can ring the changes as often as you launder your sheets. Lift a chic, pale-grey set with a hit of hot pink, or add another dimension to a latte shade with a touch of pale blue. It's also nice to mix different textures and levels of colour rather than everything matching exactly, which can appear rather flat. 'It looks fantastic - and you can add or remove sheets and throws as the temperature changes,' says Chrissie Rucker, founder of The White Company.Colour and pattern 'The key to successfully combining colours and patterns is to understand that patterns that are too similar will compete,' says Richard Boyle, CEO of Yves Delorme UK. 'Instead, mix florals with stripes or plaids, and bold patterns with delicate prints or block colours, and let them play off one another.' Now bed linen is becoming more fashion-orientated, pattern is officially 'in' and most companies produce twice-yearly collections. 'Be adventurous,' says Richard. 'Patterned bed linen can be so versatile. Even if you're unsure, there's the option to team a patterned duvet cover with plain sheets.'CARING FOR YOUR BED LINENSteer clear of products with blueing agents or whiteners, which can age sheets prematurely. And don't overload the machine as it breaks down the fibres in cotton.Rotate your sheets with a set in the cupboard, a set on the bed and a set in the wash. This ensures that no one set receives more wear than another, and consider having different summer and winter sets, so you can slip from crisp cotton to cosy flannel.Ensure your linen is perfectly dry before storing, and keep it in a dust-free place away from direct sunlight, which can bleach it. If you don't have a linen cupboard, use divan drawers, an ottoman, a trunk, or a lined bottom drawer. For the whitest whites, don't overload your machine (keep it two-thirds full), use a good-quality detergent (if you don't have sensitive skin, opt for bio over non-bio) and wash at 60ºC.Turn items inside-out before washing to help protect colours and to prevent embroidery or detailing catching on other items.The experts at Yves Delorme recommend avoiding washing cotton bed linen with other fabrics like polyester to prevent pilling, and either line dry, or tumble dry on a low heat until slightly damp (over-drying is the biggest way to shorten the life of your linen).For allergy sufferers and those with sensitive skin, avoid any bed linen that's labelled 'easy iron' as its fibres have been coated in a chemical solution of polymers to make them lie flat.Ensure your beauty sleep by investing in quality bedding - read our buyer's guide to quilts and pillows.
2021 07 26
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Easy Ways to Add Five-star Designer Appeal
Easy Ways to Add Five-star Designer Appeal
Plush towels and ceramic accessories can add five-star appeal to bathrooms.Source:SuppliedIF you are limited in time and money, there are simple improvements that will make an instant and impressive difference to your home.Rather than structural changes that can eat into your budget and take longer than expected, some small decorative touches will give your home a polished look with minimal expense.Artwork Whether you want to keep your walls simple and hang one large, dramatic piece above a fireplace, sofa or hall table, or create an entirely different look with a "gallery" style wall of art, both will make a huge difference. Art has a way of making a home appear finished and grown up.It doesn't have to be expensive, either. It can be as simple as a beautiful piece of framed or stretched fabric, or your children's artworks framed and hung in a collection. You could also enlarge a creative image of an exotic destination from your travels, hang charming antique plates in a group, or use a favourite wallpaper in multiple frames.Tile paintResurfacing has become a huge trend because it is effective, affordable and fast. Gone are the days when the paint would scratch off in a few months.Resurfacing is perfect for updating kitchens and bathrooms on a budget.LightingUpdated lighting can work wonders to improve a room. If you can't replace lights, some new shades on pendant or table lamps will help.B ed linenQuality bed linen gives a sophisticated feel to any bedroom. High thread count linen gives an air of luxury. I like all white in a bedroom because it is the most serene, fresh and stylish colour.If you wish, you can add colour and texture in cushions, but when selling avoid fully patterned bed covers as they are overpowering.Gloss paintGlossy, white paintwork on trims has a designer effect in a room. It lifts the feeling of a room by reflecting light and imparting a shiny, chic look.Matching towels and bathroom accessoriesLike good quality bed linen, a few plush bath towels will give a bathroom five-star appeal. Ensure that they are matching in colour - white, cream, black or charcoal are all good options.Invest in some ceramic or glass toothbrush holders, handwash dispensers and cups that will give your bathroom a hotel style.Fresh flowers and scented candlesIn any room in your home, fresh flowers and a lightly scented candle will make a big difference for little money. If you have the budget for only one area, focus on the entry or living room as this creates a lasting first impression.New rugsMask unsightly stains or scratched floors with a stylish rug to give your home a new look.- Juliet Love is a stylist and interior designer who runs her own business, Love Style
2021 07 24
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Cotton Household Textiles - Opportunities for Exporters.
Cotton Household Textiles - Opportunities for Exporters.
COTTON HOUSEHOLD TEXTILES - OPPORTUNITIES FOR EXPORTERS Imports are playing an increasingly important role in the largeWest European market for cotton household textiles, according to a newstudy. Although total consumption of cotton bed linen, towels and tablelinen is not growing to any great extent in these markets, the expandingrole of imports to meet the extensive demand that exists is ofparticular interest to developing countries, which are among theprincipal foreign sources. Over the 1980-88 period the share of demandcovered by imports rose dramatically - from 27% to 42% for bed linen,from 48% to 62% for towels and from 39% to 56% for table linen. In 1988developing countries accounted for 42% of total imports of bed lineninto the four leading importing countries (supplying about 27,000 tons),35% of the towels imported (over 20,000 tons) and 57% of the table linen(6,500 tons). Although importers do not readily switch to new suppliers,exporters who can provide goods of consistent, specified qualityaccording to delivery schedules may be able to find openings. Market trends Imports of bed linen, table linen and towels into the four majormarkets reviewed (France, Federal Republic of Germany, Italy and theUnited Kingdom) increased annually between 1980 and 1988, moving fromaround 84,000 tons of goods at the beginning of the decade to about133,000 tons in 1988. This upward trend may well continue to theadvantage of developing country exporters. However overall consumptionof household textiles has been more or less stable over the last severalyears. Since 1980, for example, the total market for bed linen in Italyand France has grown slowly, while in the United Kingdom and the FederalRepublic of Germany it has remained relatively static. Demand is notexpected to grow dramatically in any of these product groups, but theshare of imports should expand within the total market. Bed linen: Imports of bed linen into the four major West Europeanmarkets accelerated during the 1980s. Between 1980 and 1988 totalimports of bed linen rose by about 68%, from 38,100 tons to 63,800 tons.Imports of cotton and cotton-rich bed linen increased even faster,expanding by 97% during the same period, to 56,100 tons in 1988. The share of imports accounted for by developing countries hasgrown considerably. While in 1980 these countries supplied 30% of thetotal, eight years later their share had reached 42%. In volume terms,imports from these countries attained a record level of 27,000 tons in1988. This compares with 16,900 tons imported in 1987 and 11,600 tons in1980. Of the four countries surveyed, the Federal Republic of Germany isby far the largest import market for bed linen. In 1988 its totalforeign purchases in this category amounted to 28,100 tons, 15% higherthan in the previous year and 80% above the 1980 level. While over 98%of these imports were classified as cotton and cotton-rich, it can beassumed that the goods in question were almost entirely of cotton.Developing countries accounted for around 44% of the FederalRepublic's imports in 1988, or 12,200 tons. The major suppliersamong this group were Pakistan, Turkey and India, which exported 3,935tons, 3,311 tons and 2,057 tons respectively to the Federal Republic.These three countries combined accounted for about three-quarters of thetotal imports from developing countries. exports small quantities of bedlinen to the Federal Republic, while Indonesia has become a new source,supplying 369 tons to this market in 1988. Imports of bed linen into both the United Kingdom and France havealso expanded over the last several years, although from a lower level.In the United Kingdom, of total imports of 14,300 tons in 1988,approximately 6,900 tons were supplied by developing countries, while inFrance developing country imports reached 5,100 tons that year out oftotal imports of 14,400 tons. As in the Federal Republic of Germany, themajor supplying developing countries to the United Kingdom in 1988 werePakistan, with 3,263 tons; India, with 1,421 tons; and Turkey, with1,022 tons. These three accounted for 83% of total imports of bed linenfrom developing countries. However, unlike in the Federal Republic ofGermany where 63% of developing country supplies were of printed woven cotton bed linen, in the U.K. market the major imports were of unprintedgoods. Imports of bed linen into France are predominantly made of wovencotton, both printed and unprinted. A large number of countries supplythis market, each with relatively small quantities. While Pakistan,India and Turkey are leading sources, Thailand was the major exporter ofbed linen to France in 1988 with 1,388 tons. China, Tunisia, Egypt andMauritius also supply small quantities to France. Italy is the largest manufacturer of bed linen in the EuropeanCommunity and is the smallest importer of this product. In 1988 itstotal foreign purchases of these items reached 7,000 tons, 23% higherthan a year earlier. Nevertheless, Italian imports continued to expandduring the 1980s, and by 1988 were nearly 80% above the 1980 level.Italy's orders from developing countries almost doubled, from 1,400tons to 2,700 tons between 1980 and 1988, with the major suppliers beingPakistan, Turkey and China. Total and per capita consumption of bed linen in the major WestEuropean countries is very large, albeit relatively stable. In 1988consumption reached 150,800 tons. While this was almost 13% higher thanin 1987, consumption was only 5% above the 1980 figure. Since cotton isby far the most important fibre for bed linen, shifts are likely tooccur around a stable level of consumption as cotton prices fluctuate.Given the per capita income in the Federal Republic of Germany, it isnot surprising that consumption of bed linen is the highest there of thefour countries surveyed. The reason for the slowly changing level ofconsumption in that market during the 1980s was both a low populationgrowth rate and a shift towards goods of a higher quality. Furthermore,bed sizes tend to be up to 20% larger than in both France and the UnitedKingdom, which would also account for a higher volume of consumption. The ratio of imports of bed linen to total consumption increasedsignificantly for the four markets during the 1980s, from almost 27% in1980 to 42% in 1988. The Federal Republic of Germany has the highestimport dependency ratio for bed linen, which in 1988 reached over 60%,almost doubling the 1980 figure. The ratios have also increased inFrance, the United Kingdom and Italy. By 1988 these stood at 41%, 46%and 18% respectively. While these proportions are in themselves high,large quantities of fabrics - of which the bulk is cotton - are alsoimported into Western Europe to be converted into finished products. Inthe case of the United Kingdom, for example, imports of cotton fabricsaccount for almost 90% of total materials used in manufacturing bedlinen, while the comparable figures for France, the Federal Republic ofGermany and Italy are above 50%. An estimated 70% of the bed linenconsumed in the major markets of Western Europe is made from importedfabrics. Towels: In direct contrast with the unchanging level of domesticproduction, the importation of made-up towels into the four markets hasshown strong growth, particularly since 1985. After changing littleduring the first half of the 1980s - at about 38,000 tons - imports oftowels have risen in each successive year. Total foreign purchasesamounted to 57,800 tons in 1988, 13% above the 1987 level, which wasitself almost 19% higher than in 1986. Cotton and cotton-rich towelimports - again almost exclusively of pure cotton - reached 56,000 tonsin 1988, 97% of the total consumed. Imports from developing countries have shown a similar upwardmovement since 1985 in terms of volume, and their share of the markethas also risen. By 1988 supplies of made-up towels from developingcountries had reached 20,100 tons, 3,800 tons higher than in 1987 andmore than double the 1985 figure. The market share of developingcountries was 35% in 1988 compared with 26% in 1985. As with many other textile products, the United Kingdom is thelargest import market for towels. In 1988 these imports totalled 20,300tons, 25% higher than in 1987 and three-fifths above the level at thebeginning of the decade. Almost all imports are of pure cotton, with thebulk being of terry towelling. Supplies to the United Kingdom fromdeveloping countries amounted to 6,300 tons in 1988, 19% higher than ayear earlier; two-thirds of these were made from terry fabrics. A largenumber of developing countries supply the U.K. market. The mostsignificant in 1988 were Pakistan, China, Turkey and India, whichexported 1,284 tons, 1,252 tons, 1,187 tons and 901 tons respectively.Brazil, Egypt, Indonesia and Sri Lanka and, to a lesser extent,Mauritius and Thailand were also emerging suppliers. While the Federal Republic of Germany ranked only second as animporter of towels into Western Europe, it was the largest consumingcountry during the period as far as developing countries are concerned.Total imports during 1988 amounted to 17,400 tons, 6% higher than theprevious year, with terry towels accounting for three-quarters of thetotal. Imports from developing countries reached 7,600 tons the sameyear, registering a gain of 21% over 1987. Brazil is the leadingsupplier; in 1988 its exports of made-up towels to the Federal Republicamounted to 2,400 tons, 31% of the total. These were entirely of terrycloth. Other major suppliers were Pakistan, Turkey and China, eachproviding over 1,000 tons, while smaller amounts came from Colombia,India, Indonesia, Mauritius and Taiwan Province (China). Although imports of made-up towels into both France and Italy havealso expanded, by 44% and 100% respectively between 1985 and 1988, tototal 13,700 tons and 6,400 tons, neither are large markets fordeveloping countries. Supplies from these countries amounted to 3,300tons for France and 2,900 tons for Italy in 1988. Imports into Francecome mainly from Pakistan, China, Brazil, Cameroon, India and Sri Lanka,while Brazil, Pakistan, India and Cuba are significant exporters oftowels to Italy. Total and per capita consumption of made-up towels in the fourcountries has shown very rapid growth since the middle of the 1980s. By1988 consumption in the four markets combined had reached 93,300 tons,almost 7% above the 1987 level and 15% higher than that of 1980. Cottonmade-up towels accounted for 98% of total consumption. The relativelyhigh proportion of heavier bath towels in the U.K. market has resultedin that country being the largest consumer of this item in weight amongthe four markets. In 1988 U.K. consumption amounted to 31,600 tons,one-third of the total of the four. The Federal Republic of Germany wasthe second largest consumer, followed by France and Italy. Between 1980 and 1988 the proportion of imports to totalconsumption in the four countries rose from 48% to 62%. For France, theFederal Republic of Germany and the United Kingdom, the ratio was above60%, while that for Italy was 40%. The rise in this ratio was mostapparent in the case of the Federal Republic. Between 1980 and 1988 theproportion went from 48% to 68%, which can in part be explained by arise in the volume of imports. Again, since imports of terry fabrics areused in the domestic production of made-up towels, the actual importshare in terms of fabric content is higher, possibly by an additionalten percentage points. Table linen: As in the cases of both bed linen and towels, indirect contrast to the declining level of domestic manufacture, importsof made-up table linen showed a continously rising trend during the1980s. Between 1980 and 1988 the total volume of table linen importedinto the four markets rose by 52%, from 7,500 tons to 11,400 tons.Imports of cotton and cotton-rich table linen is a much smaller volumemarket than either towels or bed linen, but the share of developingcountry imports has shown impressive growth. In 1980 developingcountries supplied almost 39% of total imports, while eight years latertheir share had reached 57%. In volume terms, imports from developingcountries attained a record level of 6,500 tons in 1988. This compareswith 3,800 tons in 1987 and 2,900 tons in 1980. Table : Imports of cotton household textiles into major WestEuropean markets(1) 1980-88(1) France, Federal Republic of Germany, Italy and United Kingdom. Within the European Community, the Federal Republic of Germany isthe largest market. Approximately 4,700 tons of table linen wereimported into that country in 1988, 38% higher than in the previousyear. Nearly 60% of that was considered as being cotton and cotton-rich.Developing countries account for 83% of all such imports into theFederal Republic. Knitted or crocheted table linen came to 47% - 1,840tons - of total imports from developing countries in 1988, with Turkeybeing by far the most important supplier. The other 2,100 tons importedconsisted of woven table linen. China, Brazil and India were the threemajor sources, providing 865 tons, 459 tons and 216 tons respectively in1988. Smaller suppliers included the Philippines, the Republic of Koreaand Malaysia. While France is the second largest importer of made-up table linen,at 3,000 tons in 1988, developing countries do not have an importantmarket share. Since 1980 less than 1,000 tons per annum have beensupplied from these sources. The two largest developing countrysuppliers are China and India. In the case of Italy, imports of table linen continued to growduring the 1980s, albeit from a low base. In 1988 around 2,400 tons werepurchased from foreign sources, of which over 90% were of cotton andblends rich in cotton. Developing countries accounted for half of thevolume traded, all of which was of cotton. The major suppliers amongthese were China, India, Pakistan, Turkey and Brazil, while smallersources included Mauritius and Laos. The U.K. import market for table linen is extremely small, withannual amounts only just above 1,000 tons throughout the 1980s. Total and per capita consumption of table linen remained stablethroughout the 1980s, slightly under 20,000 tons yearly for the fourWest European countries combined. Consumption has been highest in Italyand the Federal Republic of Germany, at 7,800 tons and 7,400 tonsrespectively in 1988. Together these two account for three-quarters oftotal demand in the four major markets. The share of cotton andcotton-rich table linen is higher in Italy, at 94%, than in the FederalRepublic of Germany with 64%. One reason is that more tablecloths aremade from flax in the Federal Republic than in Italy. The United Kingdomhas the lowest level of consumption of table linen. In 1988 the figurewas only 1,500 tons. Like bed linen and towels, the import dependency ratio for tablelinen has shown an upward trend during the period, from 39% in 1980 to56% eight years later. The share for cotton and cotton-rich table linenhas shown a similar movement, rising from 35% to 51% during the sameperiod. Although France and the United Kingdom have the highest suchratios, which in 1988 exceeded 80% in both cases, in volume terms thesecountries have the smallest markets. In contrast, the largest market,Italy, has the smallest proportion of imports to total consumption. In1988 its share was ten percentage points higher than eight yearsearlier. While it is expected that the ratio will continue to grow inthese markets, in terms of volume the market for made-up table linen isone-fifth that for made-up towels and only 13% of that for bed linen. Variations in demand Considerable differences exist in consumer requirements for cottonhousehold textiles among the countries surveyed concerning quality,fabric weight, sizes, fashion, colour, fibre, finish and price. Forsuppliers approaching the West European market for the first time orsimply seeking to extend a successful operation from one Europeancustomer to another in a different country, the variation in demandbetween one geographically small area and another is frequentlyfrustrating. Particularly significant are differences in assortmentsoffered, packaging, quality and sizes. For instance, in the UnitedKingdom, at least two sizes of single beds and two of double beds are incommon use (several other sizes are also available). In the FederalRepublic of Germany beds are longer, again with several different sizevariations available. French beds measure yet other dimensions, with twoversions generally available for both double and single beds. Stillanother situation exists in Italy, where mattress lengths are up to 8 cmto 10 cm shorter than in other major West European markets. Product ranges that sell successfully in one market may requireconsiderable modification to sell well in another. Such differences aremost marked for bed linen. In the U.K. market bed linen is increasingly sold in ranges ofcoordinated curtains, pillowcases, duvet covers and valence sheets ordivan trims. Approximately 60% of the homes in that country own duvetsrequiring covers. "Divan" type beds are the most common, usingvalences (divan trims) or valence-type bottom sheets. The remainder useblankets over flat bleached or plain dyed sheets. This markets shows astrong trend for 50% cotton/50% polyester blends for sheets, pillowcasesand duvet covers. In the Federal Republic of Germany the requirements for bed linenare different. Coordination of all textile features of bed linen is muchless important than in the United Kingdom. Typical items in this lineare fitted bottom sheets, top sheets and cotton quilts. Such productsare almost entirely of cotton (above 95% of the volume sold). In France both the fitted bottom sheet and the duvet and cover haveincreasingly replaced classic flat sheets and blankets. It is estimatedthat at the retail level about half of the pieces sold are fitted top orbottom sheets, 30% are flat sheets and 15% to 20% are duvet covers.Coordination of various items of bed linen is not important in thismarket. Most bed linen sold in France is of cotton. Apparent rises incotton's share of sheets, from 82% in 1980 to 89% in 1988, areprobably the result of the movement from blends of 67% polyester/33%cotton to 50%/50% in recent years. The latter ratio has establisheditself in all blended bed linen sold in Western Europe. Italy is the market in which fine percale cotton flat sheets excel.Bottom sheets, often fitted, are frequently sold in sets with topsheets. Alongside this, however, most households have a parallelcollection of plain dyed or bleached sheets, again with the bottomsheets fitted. The use of quilts is not extensive in Italy for climaticreasons. As in the Federal Republic of Germany, bed linen ispredominantly made of cotton. Import channels The percentage of business in household textiles done by differentretailer, or retailer-type distributor categories, varies among the fourcountries. For example, in Italy 50% of the business in bed linen goes throughindependents and 30% through street market traders (independentretailers with or without permanent premises). In the United Kingdomindependents handle less than 12% of that business and street markettraders probably less. Mail-order is the most extensive in France amongthe markets surveyed, with 34% of bed linen sales (24% in the UnitedKingdom, 22% in the Federal Republic of Germany and only 5% to 6% inItaly). Such differences in the retail situation necessitate differentimport channels. The primary marketing channels for exporters to the four major WestEuropean markets are manufacturers in those markets, wholesalers,mail-order houses, major department stores, variety chains and multiplestores. In the four markets surveyed, the local manufacturer in theimporting country is one of the most important outlets for foreignsuppliers of cotton household textiles. Such companies either sell theimported merchandise under their own (or a subsidiary) brand name, orpass it on to mail-order houses, variety chain stores or other outletswith their brand name on it. The wholesaler/importer is also a significant marketing channel.Wholesaling is highly developed, particularly in the Federal Republic ofGermany. In addition to importing finished goods, wholesaler/importersalso sometimes "manufacture" their own brand by usingcommission finishers to finish and cut items of bed linen from importedgrey cloth. Their function in supplying the retail trade is verydiversified. For large mail-order companies, the wholesaler's roleis usually to provide goods that are short in supply. In the case ofsmall retail groups, the wholesaler may fill the regular requirements oract as an agent. Large retail groups, multiples and variety chains tend to importdirect. However the small size of their orders and the diversity incolour and size of their requirements are likely to make business withthem rather difficult for new suppliers to the market. Their qualityspecifications are generally much higher than those of mail-ordercompanies or wholesalers (the latter need goods at all quality levels). Major mail-order buyers attempt to purchase as much of theirrequirements as possible direct from the local manufacturers orexporters in the supplying countries. Their ability to do this varies,hence their need for secondary sources, mainly wholesalers, in order tokeep adequate supplies of the goods offered in their catalogues. Mostmail-order companies attempt to provide very short delivery times. Inthe Federal Republic of Germany they will go to great lengths andexpense to ensure this, and are therefore more hesitant to dolong-distance business than are mail-order firms in some of the othermarkets surveyed. Voluntary buying groups are essentially supplied by wholesalers andlocal manufacturers, with which they negotiate bulk purchase discountsfor their smaller retail clients. They rarely import direct. Entry into the West European market for table linen remains to agreat extent the province of specialist importers, which should beconsidered as the main target for new market entrants in most of theselines. Such importers sell to almost all entities, including retailgroups, mail-order houses and even wholesalers who are importers of bedlinen and towels. Possibilities for new suppliers Buyers of household textiles are generally unwilling to change froman existing foreign supplier to a new source without considerableincentive. Many large distributors contacted during the survey have notchanged their main import sources for five or even ten years, and fewexpressed an interest in examining new sources in countries they had notdealt with before. On the other hand, as wage levels rise in what have hitherto beenlow-cost producers among traditional suppliers, new sources are likelyto be looked at more carefully. Some buyers have begun to visitdeveloping countries to survey such prospects. Buyers have expressedparticular interest in countries ready to re-equip with up-to-datemachinery, in which existing industrial and training skills are in placeto make such investment worthwhile. Firms already producing for theirown domestic or another export market are given special consideration inthis context.D.E. Morris, P. Ruttyn and R.J. Stogdon work with the InternationalInstitute for Cotton in Brussels. This article is based on a study thatthey recently prepared for ITC, Cotton Household Textiles: A Survey ofSelected Western European Markets, covering France, Federal Republic ofGermany, Italy and the United Kingdom. PHOTO : Developing countries are major suppliers. Left, qualitycontrol in the United Republic of Tanzania. PHOTO : Imports of bed linen have risen rapidly. At right,finishing of cotton sheeting.
2021 07 24
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Ikea Suits Are Available to Buy and They Literally Match Your Bed
Ikea Suits Are Available to Buy and They Literally Match Your Bed
Ikea might have the best meatballs and provide hours of endless fun but it's not known for its clothes.That's because the Swedish superstore has never sold any clothes...until now.The furniture retailer is now teaming up with tailor William Hunt to create a bunch of unique, limited edition suits using Ikea textiles and fabric.That means the prints you see on the suits have been inspired by items available at the store, like bed linen, wallpaper and chairs. And they actually look pretty rad.It's all in an attempt to encourage people to bring personality into their home simply and affordably by using textiles.Fashion is always evolving after all, so there's no reason it can't take inspiration from home interiors.'I love the idea of people taking fashion and style and embracing it by taking it further into their homes.' said William Hunt.'Our partnership with Ikea is important as we are encouraging the public to push themselves just a little, and to show off their character in their own homes.'We at William Hunt create heroes out of ordinary men and women through our suits, the Ikea suits create heroes out of everyday textiles and furniture.'Ikea was further motivated to create the colourful new suits after finding that people were playing it safe, (83%) opting for white and beige products.'We're seeing an increasing number of people playing it safe when it comes to decorating and furnishing their home' said Carol McSeveny, textiles leader at Ikea. 'But, when the home can act as a canvas for self-expression, why keep things beige and boring'People use fabric in fashion to show off their personality and we want people to replicate this in their home through textiles.'Ikea's campaign to inject more colour and personality also comes after an astonishing 16 million Brits say they don't have the confidence to fully express themselves in their homes.Some of the reasons cited include not knowing what's on trend and worrying what guests will think.So if you want to start off with your clothes first then your furniture, you can enter the and win one of the limited edition suits.
2021 07 23
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Joe Wilson's Ductigami Shows How to Make Stuff with Duct Tape
Joe Wilson's Ductigami Shows How to Make Stuff with Duct Tape
When Joe Wilson signs copies of his book, he invariably includes "Veni, vidi, ducti" as part of the salutation.Which makes you wonder what Julius Caesar might have accomplished if he, too, had duct tape at his disposal, since the book in question happens to be Ductigami: The Art of the Tape.If the Roman, as he reputedly said, came, saw and conquered, Wilson has certainly taped, fashioning everything from wallets to sou'westers out of the grey tape first created for the U.S. military during World War II.The need then was for something strong and waterproof that could be used to make stop-gap repairs in the field to all manner of equipment. Wilson says former pilots have even told him they used it to cover the gun ports on the wings to reduce drag during takeoff. (It would also let them know whether a gun, if still covered in unbroken tape, was malfunctioning.)The postwar housing boom and the popularity of forced-air furnaces soon enough transformed the adhesive, cloth-like tape into a civilian commonplace, and a kind of artistry wasn't long in following.Wilson's first creative encounter with duct tape came while working at his father's clothing store in Guelph, when a young woman pulled a wallet made from duct tape out of her bag. Wilson was so charmed by it that he concocted his own way of making a wallet, and then started selling them. "I couldn't make them fast enough," he says.There followed a self-published how-to book in 1997, later picked up and republished by Boston Mills Press, which has since sold 53,000 copies, with another print run of 12,000 scheduled to arrive next week in time for the fall season."Twice a year, I get a nice little royalty cheque," says Wilson, who reckons the enduring appeal of both the tape and the book isn't that surprising.Just about every household has a story of some disaster averted or problem solved with an ingenious application of duct tape. Then there are all the travel yarns, such as first aid administered to torn tents or shins during a camping trip, not to mention the inspirational antics of comedian Red Green, with his core dictum: "Spare the duct tape, spoil the job."Like Green's creations, many of Wilson's are equally flights of fancy. His book includes directions for making superhero masks, a woven purse, a tool belt and raingear for pets.His version of a wallet, Star-tested in the manner of a recipe, took about 30 minutes to complete, including soccer-style stoppage time to make up for delays caused by various rookie mishaps.Note: loose duct tape, being very sticky, has a way of bundling itself into a messy knot when you least expect it.Second note: you need very sharp scissors.Addendum to second note: be prepared to replace the kitchen scissors you've just ruined or, depending on the habits of your particular household, be ready to feign ignorance.If the wallet ever wears out or gets damaged, you can always repair it with more tape.But be careful here. A wallet made from duct tape does have one, slightly ironic, enemy: heat. That's especially true for guys who like to tote their wallets in a back pocket, and end up spending a lot of time sitting on their billfold."It heats up a little back there," says Wilson, who likes to call the ensuing spread of stickiness, "adhesive migration."In the book, Wilson suggests doing all the work on a cutting board, but admits in an interview that he usually works on a sheet of glass and uses an X-acto knife to make the necessary cuts. (See second note and addendum, above.)He also favours duct tape with a lot of threads, called "scrim," just as you'd check the thread count when buying a dress shirt or bed linen. "The more you spend, the better the tape," he notes. "You get what you pay for."That generally means something north of $5 for a 20-metre roll, enough for several wallets.In his travels, Wilson has seen or heard about everything from canoes to formal dresses being made out of duct tape. One website even has a gallery of life-sized lions and other animals made from the stuff, although not everyone is amused. To wit: The Catholic school board in Windsor, Ont., suspended a group of teenage girls earlier this year when they wore tops made of blue duct tape that spelled out the name of their school hockey team.But even that sort of kerfuffle isn't apt to dampen the enthusiasm of aficionados. "Now, duct tape comes in 15, 18 colours," says Wilson. "Once you've got the principles, it's just a matter of the creativity of the individual."The main principle is that, with most projects, you start by fashioning the tape into larger sheets. This involves attaching strips of tape together in such a way that the adhesive is on the inside, leaving you with a sheet whose exterior is shiny (and nonsticky) on both sides.In theory, at least, there's really no limit to how big you could make that sheet for whatever creation you happened to have in mind.Wilson's book, for instance, includes directions for making a shower curtain, although he concedes that, despite his own enthusiasm for duct tape, even he hasn't actually made one of those himself."It would probably weigh about 400 pounds."
2021 07 23
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